St. Francis Medical Center – Health Scholar Program

About the CCE Program and SFMC:

The Clinical Care Extender Internship features a clinically-focused experience that gives pre-health professionals unprecedented access to direct patient care. Clinical Care Extender Interns become valuable members of the patient care team alongside nurses, physicians and allied health professionals in clinical and administrative settings. Interns receive training to participate in basic patient care tasks such as bathing, changing and feeding patients as they rotate among the different departments within the hospital. For instance, interns may have the opportunity to serve in areas such as the Emergency Department, observe surgeries performed in the Operating Rooms or witness babies being born in Labor & Delivery.

St. Francis Medical Center (SFMC) exists to serve the healthcare and social needs: body, mind, and spirit of the communities of Southeast Los Angeles. St. Francis Medical Center is founded upon and advances the healing ministry of Christ in the tradition of service established by St. Vincent de Paul, St. Louise de Marillac and St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. We are also a part of the Daughters of Charity Health System in California.

Our vision is to be a values-driven integrated healthcare delivery system in collaboration with those who share our values. We promote the full development of the human person, preservation of health and well-being of the community, and just reimbursement for these services.

Reflecting the guiding principle of the Daughters of Charity — serving the sick poor, no ill or injured man, woman or child is ever turned away because of the inability to pay for needed care. Philanthropic endeavors focus on nurturing healthy children and families, building self-sufficiency, and achieving excellence in facilities and technology with the ultimate goal of enhancing the health of its community.

We provide patient-centered, economical health services with a special concern for the sick poor and their families. We operate a 384-bed acute care hospital, six community-based health clinics, and the largest and busiest private emergency trauma center in Los Angeles County — treating 69,000 children and adults each year. Last year, more than 6,000 babies were born at SFMC’s Family Life Center, with 775 babies cared for in our state-of-the-art Neonatal Intensive Care Center. Our Healthy Community Initiatives bring healthcare services to children and families in their schools and neighborhoods. In addition, we operate the Children’s Counseling Center for abused and neglected children, St. Francis Career College, and a broad range of educational and community services programs.

Accessible By: Car

Length of Commitment: 280 hours (4 hrs/ week + monthly meetings)

Shifts Available: 7am-11am, 11am – 3pm, 3pm- 7pm, 7pm – 11pm 7 days a week. Rotation #1 is Medsurge: Oncology, Trauma, or Telemetry Shifts for other rotations vary.

Interviews: TBA

Orientation: TBA

TB Testing: 2 step TB required

Other Requirements: After interviewing you will need to complete BLS for the Health Care Provider CPR Certification from the American Heart Association

Website: http://www.copehealthsolutions.org/clinical-internships/clinical-care-extender

http://stfrancis.dochs.org/

Reviews:

 

When I go to volunteer, my main goal is to make each shift a memorable one, even if what I experience seems so minor. By doing so, I get to personalize each interaction, and each task into my purpose for pursuing the medicine. The Health Scholar Program at St. Francis really allows me to do so by providing opportunities for hands-on service to patients. In no other hospital have I been able to take the patient’s vitals. In not other hospital have I been able to do something as personal as feed, ambulate, and bathe a patient. I am able to familiarize myself with the patient experience during their hospital stay, and I think this will allow me to better provide patient’s with the best care in the future.

As far as getting started in the program, the clearance process is definitely a long process, but rightfully so. Because Health Scholars are entrusted with many roles, it is essential that they get proper training. There are 2 all day training days, where we learn about hospital protocols, proper patient interactions, and medical information like the stable ranges for blood pressure, heart rate, respiration, and O2 saturation. The expectations of volunteers are made clear to ensure that patient receives the best quality of care, considering we are part of the patient-care team alongside nurses and physicians.

Throughout the whole application cycle, as well as being part of the program, administrator communication has been commendable. Each department is assigned department coordinators that help resolve issues. The department coordinators are so efficient at replying to emails and working with Health Scholars to solve problems, that I personally haven’t had the need to contact the program coordinator, Kierra Washington, at all.

 

For these reasons, I value the Health Scholar program, and try to make the best out of every shift, because I have been given the chance to grow and learn.

Second Semester Student

Fall 2016

 

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The clearance process is a very long one for St. Francis Medical Center. There are three rotations throughout the year for which you can apply online through their COPE Health Solutions site. This site is also useful for making connections with alumni or current health scholars who can be of help in the future. The application itself includes personal background information, past work experience, and about 4 essay questions. Once the application is turned in and you have received confirmation of the submission, you have to just wait a couple weeks for an email asking you to come in for an interview or rejecting your application.

The interview is a group interview, but the setting may be different depending on when you sign up for an interview. For my interview, five of us applicants each rotated around 5 different tables with a staff member or leadership board member and we were given 5 minutes at each table to answer 1 question. The questions ranged from the reason for wanting to join the program to responding to a given scenario that raises an ethical or moral question. When I spoke with other applicants, however, I found that some of them had an interview where there were 2-3 staff or leadership board members who interviewed 5 to 6 applicants at once and called on each of them to answer questions. One table, during my interview, was specifically for asking any questions that you had about the program, so I had the chance to ask all the questions I had thought of beforehand at once.

Once you pass the interview, you have to go to a clearance appointment within in the next two weeks, where they check your immunization records and CPR certification to verify that you can be working in the hospital. There is also a background check that they do electronically to check your legal background. All the staff members and leadership board members are very friendly, and they respond quickly if you e-mail them with any questions or concerns.

After you are cleared to work in the hospital, you have three training days that go from 7:30am to 5:30pm, and this is when you learn about the hospital, the program, the medical terminology used in the hospital, basic medical information, the skills you need to be able to perform, and more. If you miss one training day, you are cut from the program. On the last training day, you take a written and practical exam and you must get an 80% or above on both to pass. They say that if you don’t pass either one on the first try, you must reapply for the next rotation, but they are a little more lenient on the actual day than they make it seem at first. Lastly, you need to shadow a current Health Scholar before starting your own shifts.

1st Semester Student
Fall 2015

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The Clinical Care Extender program, now called the Health Scholar program, at St. Francis Medical Center, located in the city of Lynwood, is a great program for students interested in pursuing careers in healthcare.  Do not be discouraged by the long application, interview, and testing process.  As long as you put your mind to it and put a bit of effort, you’ll be accepted into the program.  This volunteering program does require the most time commitment out of all the Trojan Health Volunteer programs that are offered.  However, this time commitment allows you to really explore the in’s and out’s of this hospital.  Once graduating from this program, one would have completed at least 6 rotations, meaning six different floors.

Although many volunteers had to take a one-hour bus ride to get to and from St. Francis every shift, the volunteer experiences from St. Francis were worthwhile.  This is a program that allows you to work alongside all personnel of the medical staff- certified nurse assistants, registered nurses, physician’s assistant, and even physicians.  All the medical staff here are willing to teach eager minds like ours.

Starting off this program, all clinical care extender interns volunteer on the medical/surgery departments including oncology, trauma, or telemetry.  Typically, on these shifts, volunteers obtain vital signs of patients, which include blood pressure, oxygen saturation, heart rate, respiratory rate, and temperature.  In addition, volunteers bring patients water, food, and other supplies such as blankets to patients.  As volunteers advance into the program, they are given more responsibility but are in return awarded more worthwhile experiences.  Volunteers can begin observing surgeries or volunteer in the emergency department where they observe sutures, assist in splinting patients’ extremities.  Overall, St. Francis Medical Center’s clinical care extender program is an invaluable experience that will prepare any students interested in the field of healthcare.

2nd Semester Student
Fall 2015

**This student used to volunteer at St. Francis, but transferred to White Memorial Medical Center Center this semester through the same COPE Health Solutions’ Clinical Care Extender program.**

White Memorial Medical Center is a hospital located fairly close to USC, and days with limited traffic it is a ten minute drive. The hospital is accessible by bus but not really by train. However, it is much more convenient to get to than the other CCE location offered by THV (St. Francis). White is located in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of East Los Angeles. Accordingly, there is a largely Spanish-speaking patient population so knowing Spanish is very useful. The Clinical Care Extender (CCE) internship is offered at White, and I highly recommend it. As opposed to filing papers or restocking bins and cabinets I spend my shifts helping nurses with their patients. This can include moving patients, cleaning patients, taking their vitals, helping to administer medications, and more! Additionally, because White Memorial is a teaching hospital (meaning that residents are trained and taught there) the nurses are extremely open to teaching undergraduates about certain procedures. Examples of procedures that I have assisted with are diagnosing a stroke (luckily CT scan showed no cranial bleed), inserting NG tubes, and changing the dressing on chest tubes. I have worked 2 semesters on the Cardiovascular Definitive Observation Unit. Working on this floor means that you will also be asked to use heart monitors and EKGs, which is pretty cool. Also, if you work on this floor try to meet MichelIa, Frank, Ricardo, and Heather. They are all exceptionally helpful and informative, and they have taught me a lot. Further, I will be moving down to the Emergency Department, and I was actually trained there today. It is fast paced and active, so your shift will fly by. Other departments offered are Peri-Operative, MedSurge, and Postpartum, but the internship is always adding more, with ICU next on the list. While this internship is fantastic (and I think the best local option for pre-health students) the administration can be very frustrating. For example, the manager can be tricky work with. They will lose your info and make you retest for TB, and it will waste your precious time. My advice is to always argue your point, and if you know that you are not wrong do not give up easily. I didn’t, and it turns out my last TB test was magically recovered. Moreover, they are in charge of a large group of people whom they govern with a strict set of rules that sometimes make the CCEs feel less like volunteers and more like paid staff. Scheduling can be hectic, but fortunately shifts are available from 7am-11pm on any day of the year, so they are plentiful. As long as you can put up with the fact that the administration will occasionally make errors and frustrate you, this internship is a great opportunity that I would highly recommend.

4th Semester Student
Spring 2015

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This semester was my first semester at St. Francis Medical Center. St. Francis had a long training process that involved 3 training days (7am-6pm each day, but sometimes they let you out early) and a exam on the third training day. They offer leadership positions to Clinical Care Extenders and a lot of options with rotations. The trauma rotation is SFMC’s “baby.” It takes a minimum of 5 rotations to get to the trauma rotation. Overall, I am really liking my experience at SFMC. CCEs are given a lot of opportunities, and if you are proactive with your volunteer experience, you can learn and accomplish a lot. Doctors and nurses are really willing to teach you anything you ask about. I have never had a shift at St. Francis that was boring. A regular shift at St. Francis involves taking lots of vitals for the nurses, bathing patients, feeding patients, and moving patients. I would really recommend St. Francis to anyone who is willing to commit long term to a THV site.

Spring 2014

I’ve just recently begun volunteering at St. Francis Medical Center as a Clinical Care Extender and I would say that so far I am enjoying my experience there.  I am in my first rotation and currently volunteer on the 7th floor which is oncology.  Once you get past the long hours of training and the first few difficult shifts of figuring everything out, the experience becomes very valuable and I have been doing things I never thought I would be exposed to this early on in my medical career.  What the Clinical Care Extender program really focuses on is patient care so there is a lot of time spent with the patients which is a very important – often overlooked – aspect of healthcare.  I feel that this is a good opportunity, especially for students hoping to become doctors one day, to see how nurses and hospital staff care for patients.  At first, I was a little bit annoyed by some of the nurses who didn’t seem willing to help or who seemed condescending but you have to realize that the nurses are very busy and you have to make friends with the right ones who can give you tips here and there.  It is also important to show initiative because the nurses are too busy to babysit you and they really appreciate the interns going the extra mile.  One last comment I would make is on the location.  The hospital is located in Lynwood which is definitely something to be aware of.  The neighborhood is not safe so I would recommend anyone considering this location to drive or be a part of a carpool that you can trust.  Otherwise, St. Francis is a great hospital and I am excited to continue working there and continuing onto more rotations in the future!

Francesca Corley
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
—–

Volunteering at St. Francis Hospital has been a very interesting and growing experience for me.  I’ve gotten to do things that I’ve always wanted to do, but have also had to do things that I didn’t necessarily see myself doing before this program.  Nonetheless, all of my experiences, good and bad, have taught me a lot about the health care field and myself.  One of my favorite parts about volunteering at this hospital is the amount of time I get to spend with the patients.  For example, every shift I get take patient vitals (my favorite part), deliver water and food, sometimes feed patients who can’t feed themselves, and am constantly circulating the floor checking if the patients need anything.  What I like to do when the nurses don’t have anything for me to do, is go into each patient’s room asking if they need anything.  On many occasions, I have gotten to know a few of the patients personally, getting a chance to have long chats with them.  It’s important to remember that many of the patients in the hospital, especially those who don’t have family or friends visiting them, are very lonely and like having someone to talk to.  Definitely take the opportunity to talk to the patients and be as kind and helpful as you can.  That will make your volunteer experience very rewarding.  There are also aspects of this volunteer position that can be difficult.  For example, oftentimes the CNA or other nurses will ask you to clean a patient or help them go to the bathroom.  It can be quite shocking at first and probably something you don’t want to do, but try your best to deal with it with poise and composure.  I know I struggled a little bit with this at first, but I got used to it and it’s not a big deal anymore.  Nevertheless, if you’re too uncomfortable to do anything the nurses ask you to do, just let them know and they will completely understand.  Most of the nurses are very nice!  There will be those super nice nurses and then a few not so nice ones.  All you have to do is stick with the nice ones and they will help you out and teach you how to do things with pleasure.  Also, if you’re bored and just sitting around, the time will go very slowly and you won’t get anything out of your experience.  If you keep busy and constantly walk around the floor asking if anyone needs help, time will fly and you’ll feel great at the end of your shift. Overall, it’s a great experience.

Anonymous
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
—–

I am really enjoying my time at St. Francis and I would recommend it to anyone who is serious about seeing how a hospital really functions. The training for CCE is pretty time consuming (3 day commitment) but if you are willing to dedicate that time, expense (application fee, vaccinations, CPR certification) and effort it is so worth it in the end. I am in my first rotation so most of my day consists of: taking vitals, delivering food and water, feeding patients and assisting nurses with bathing, changing, moving and discharging patients. When I first began at St. Francis the best advice they gave me was to be outgoing and this is the best advice I can give to anyone. I cannot stress enough the opportunities I have been given because I was willing to be outgoing. You may at times feel like you are bugging the nurses by constantly asking them what they would like you to do however when there is something to do you will be the first person they call over. Make a real effort to learn their names because they do take notice if address them by their name. Do not be afraid to ask questions, especially to the CNAs who are more than happy to explain certain procedures or tasks. And if there are days where there is not much to do, I recommend going around and knocking on patient’s doors and asking them if they need anything. Most patients always need something or just want to talk to someone, so this is a great way to fill downtime. Always keep a smile on; this makes you more approachable by nurses, CNAs, patients and their families. Some of the staff or patients may not be familiar with your role as a CCE so they may be hesitant to ask for your help so if you make it clear that you are eager to learn and assist them in anyway you can while having a positive attitude, I guarantee they will begin asking you to help them with all sorts of things.

Anonymous
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
——-

The volunteer experience at St. Francis is an invaluable way to gain exposure in the medical field. So far, I believe it has helped me become more confident in my career path choice. At first I was not sure what I was getting myself into when I attended the 30 hour orientation and training session. They of course over prepared us, but it was for the better, because now I feel thatI can perform any of the tasks they taught us. The nurses are surprisingly pleasant and courteous and love to talk to us. Even more surprising was how pleasant the patients have been. The nurses definitely have strong opinions about healthcare and career paths but it is really useful to just stop and have a conversation with them. At first, when I learned that St. Francis did not provide opportunities to shadow physicians, I was unsure of how much I would be allowed to see. However, I feel that I have already been given many hands-on opportunities to work with patients and learn about their diagnoses as well as patient-care. The staff enjoys teasing the CCE’s sometimes but it keeps things entertaining. If you want to have exposure to many different fields of medicine, St. Francis is a great starting place. – 5/5

Brittany Lala
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
——

Among the various places to volunteer, St. Francis requires the most commitment — 280 volunteer hours in order to graduate the program. Although the commitment is intimidating, the program offers many perks which aren’t properly conveyed to THV students upon initial site selection. Firstly, St. Francis is a “pipeline” program, meaning if you return to work at St. Francis, or any of their sister hospitals after professional school, you will be given some type of priority if you graduate the program with good reviews from the nurses.  I, personally, have never experienced or heard of this type of opportunity and with the competitive nature of the medical field, find it very advantageous. Secondly, you have a very hands-on, interactive experience with nurses and patients where you are not coddled, but trusted and taken seriously. Finally, you have the option of experiencing five different rotations within the hospital. Although I am on my first rotation, the choices for the five rotations cover a range of  departments and offer many desirable choices. As a pre-med student, I think the opportunity to explore different designations within the hospital may help THV participants to decide where they want to be in the future. Overall, I highly recommend this site and have enjoyed my volunteer experience so far.  I am not very religious, but the atmosphere of the hospital is unlike any I have experienced before. The nurses and hospital staff have been pleasant, appreciative, and kind towards me, which I believe is a result of the religious affiliation of the hospital. -4/5

Anonymous
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
—–

My most memorable experience at St. Francis Medical Center was when I got to see a PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter) put into a patient. It looked extremely painful and unpleasant, but I was really excited I got to see something interesting. It is a long, very thin flexible tube inserted into one of the large veins above the elbow and then threaded into a large vein that is located near the heart. It is done in the patient’s hospital room so it does not require a huge surgery or anything, but I thought it was very exciting and simply cool, and I am sure any other pre-med student would think the same. It was also a great experience because it was the CNA who was nice enough to ask me if I wanted to watch it, and the RN putting in the PICC was explaining to me step by step how it worked and answered all of my questions. It was a great learning experience.

The entire staff at St. Francis is extremely warm and welcoming. I always have a wonderful time when I am there. The nurses are so grateful for our help and it makes me feel happy to know that I am making their job easier, and that I am helping make patients more comfortable in their stay. Being at St. Francis has helped to solidify my desire to go into medicine. I enjoy being around the patients, taking vitals and learning about how a hospital works. I want to continue volunteering here next semester, however I would love to explore other places in addition to it if that is possible because I want to get as much experience as I can before I graduate.

Anonymous
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
4/5
——-

I’ve just recently begun volunteering at St. Francis Medical Center as a Clinical Care Extender and I would say that so far I am enjoying my experience there.  I am in my first rotation and currently volunteer on the 7th floor which is oncology.  Once you get past the long hours of training and the first few difficult shifts of figuring everything out, the experience becomes very valuable and I have been doing things I never thought I would be exposed to this early on in my medical career.  What the Clinical Care Extender program really focuses on is patient care so there is a lot of time spent with the patients which is a very important – often overlooked – aspect of healthcare.  I feel that this is a good opportunity, especially for students hoping to become doctors one day, to see how nurses and hospital staff care for patients.  At first, I was a little bit annoyed by some of the nurses who didn’t seem willing to help or who seemed condescending but you have to realize that the nurses are very busy and you have to make friends with the right ones who can give you tips here and there.  It is also important to show initiative because the nurses are too busy to babysit you and they really appreciate the interns going the extra mile.  One last comment I would make is on the location.  The hospital is located in Lynwood which is definitely something to be aware of.  The neighborhood is not safe so I would recommend anyone considering this location to drive or be a part of a carpool that you can trust.  Otherwise, St. Francis is a great hospital and I am excited to continue working there and continuing onto more rotations in the future!

Francesca Corley
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
—–

Volunteering at St. Francis Hospital has been a very interesting and growing experience for me.  I’ve gotten to do things that I’ve always wanted to do, but have also had to do things that I didn’t necessarily see myself doing before this program.  Nonetheless, all of my experiences, good and bad, have taught me a lot about the health care field and myself.  One of my favorite parts about volunteering at this hospital is the amount of time I get to spend with the patients.  For example, every shift I get take patient vitals (my favorite part), deliver water and food, sometimes feed patients who can’t feed themselves, and am constantly circulating the floor checking if the patients need anything.  What I like to do when the nurses don’t have anything for me to do, is go into each patient’s room asking if they need anything.  On many occasions, I have gotten to know a few of the patients personally, getting a chance to have long chats with them.  It’s important to remember that many of the patients in the hospital, especially those who don’t have family or friends visiting them, are very lonely and like having someone to talk to.  Definitely take the opportunity to talk to the patients and be as kind and helpful as you can.  That will make your volunteer experience very rewarding.  There are also aspects of this volunteer position that can be difficult.  For example, oftentimes the CNA or other nurses will ask you to clean a patient or help them go to the bathroom.  It can be quite shocking at first and probably something you don’t want to do, but try your best to deal with it with poise and composure.  I know I struggled a little bit with this at first, but I got used to it and it’s not a big deal anymore.  Nevertheless, if you’re too uncomfortable to do anything the nurses ask you to do, just let them know and they will completely understand.  Most of the nurses are very nice!  There will be those super nice nurses and then a few not so nice ones.  All you have to do is stick with the nice ones and they will help you out and teach you how to do things with pleasure.  Also, if you’re bored and just sitting around, the time will go very slowly and you won’t get anything out of your experience.  If you keep busy and constantly walk around the floor asking if anyone needs help, time will fly and you’ll feel great at the end of your shift. Overall, it’s a great experience.

Anonymous
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
—–

I am really enjoying my time at St. Francis and I would recommend it to anyone who is serious about seeing how a hospital really functions. The training for CCE is pretty time consuming (3 day commitment) but if you are willing to dedicate that time, expense (application fee, vaccinations, CPR certification) and effort it is so worth it in the end. I am in my first rotation so most of my day consists of: taking vitals, delivering food and water, feeding patients and assisting nurses with bathing, changing, moving and discharging patients. When I first began at St. Francis the best advice they gave me was to be outgoing and this is the best advice I can give to anyone. I cannot stress enough the opportunities I have been given because I was willing to be outgoing. You may at times feel like you are bugging the nurses by constantly asking them what they would like you to do however when there is something to do you will be the first person they call over. Make a real effort to learn their names because they do take notice if address them by their name. Do not be afraid to ask questions, especially to the CNAs who are more than happy to explain certain procedures or tasks. And if there are days where there is not much to do, I recommend going around and knocking on patient’s doors and asking them if they need anything. Most patients always need something or just want to talk to someone, so this is a great way to fill downtime. Always keep a smile on; this makes you more approachable by nurses, CNAs, patients and their families. Some of the staff or patients may not be familiar with your role as a CCE so they may be hesitant to ask for your help so if you make it clear that you are eager to learn and assist them in anyway you can while having a positive attitude, I guarantee they will begin asking you to help them with all sorts of things.

Anonymous
1st Semester Student
Spring 2012
5/5
—–

My experience at Saint Francis has been for the most part positive though there are a few things that the program could work on. The volunteering itself is very rewarding as interns are allowed to interact with patients regularly. For example, one of the tasks that the Clinical Care Extenders (as we volunteers are called at SFMC) are in charge of taking hourly vitals on patients to help the nurses keep tabs on the patients. I also enjoyed the program’s rotation system where interns are allowed to choose where they intern for each three month rotation. Departments include telemetry, ICU, ER, Surgery, Nursery, Pediatrics, and a few others as well. As for the things that St. Francis could work on, there a few. The first of which is the manner in which the program is run. In my opinion, the program takes itself way too seriously. For example, there is a 24 hour training done over two weekends largely full of information that is irrelevant to the actual volunteering experience followed by a 10 page exam. The training could have frankly been covered in one 8 hour session. Also, the program likes to use words like “mandatory” and “urgent” and is quick to use ultimatums in their communication for things that are not necessarily so urgent (i.e. first time asking to turn in a document). I understand that there are problem volunteers, but I would appreciate it if such language could be restricted to the volunteers that abuse program rules. Overall, I think if you are able to get over the program’s red tape and not to be alarmed by the communications of the program, St. Francis can provide a good insight into the field of healthcare.

Anonymous
3rd Semester Student
Fall 2011
4/5
——-

The site I am currently at is St. Francis Medical Center and I have been involved in the program for two rotations. One of the first things that you do for the program is go through three days of training. The training is all on the weekends, but it is all day long so you really have to make sure you can stay committed to it. I was on the 8th floor (med/surg) for my first rotation, which is where many people in the program start out on. The floor was a really interesting experience. All the things learned in training are important on this floor and there is a lot of hands on experience with patients on this floor. Some things you get to do include passing out water and food, taking vitals, and helping the nurses with whatever they need. The first rotation was very intense at first for me because I have never done anything like this before, but the nurses were very helpful and they helped me whenever I asked. I am currently on the 5th floor, post partum, and it is a very different experience than the 8th floor. On this floor, there are more opportunities to get close to the nurses and find out what their experience in the field has been like.

This program is a really good opportunity for anybody who is interested in the medical field. One of the advantages of doing this program over others is that you have the opportunity to work in different floors. Each rotation opens up more floors for you to volunteer on. For example, once you get to the 4th rotation, you could have the opportunity to work in the emergency department. I would really encourage anybody who is considering this program to do it. It may seem like a lot with the three days of training, but it really does pay off if you put in the effort. The first rotation can be somewhat rough, but it definitely gets better as you progress through the program. – 3/5

Anonymous
2nd Semester Student
Fall 2011
——

Despite St. Francis Medical Center being one of the most time-intensive sites THV has to offer, it is definitely a rewarding experience. What is best about the Clinical Care Extender program is that it offers rotations – different departments on which interns are allowed to rotate every three months/48 hours. From the time you start at SFMC, the work is very hands-on and patient-based. On your first rotation, you deal mostly with patient care, and there is a lot of interaction with the patients and nurses. As you gain more experience, you are allowed exposure to more exciting departments such as Emergency and ICU. In addition, there are departments such as pediatrics, Nursery/NICU and postpartum, which will allow you to work with mothers and their babies. There is also Fast Track for ED and Perioperative Services. Furthermore, as St. Francis is unique as a trauma center, interns are allowed to view traumas and surgeries upon their fourth rotation. Since the hospital is located in Lynwood, there are numerous cases of gun shot wounds, stabbing incidents, and other cases of gang violence that are very exciting for interns to observe. With these departments, interns are given an opportunity to work closely with physicians in addition to the rest of the patient care team. In addition, as an internship, the CCE program offers opportunities for Leadership Team, where interns will be allowed to gain more of a management perspective of a hospital setting.

Linda Huynh
2nd Semester Student
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The site I am currently at is St. Francis Medical Center and I have been involved in the program for two rotations. One of the first things that you do for the program is go through three days of training. The training is all on the weekends, but it is all day long so you really have to make sure you can stay committed to it. I was on the 8th floor (med/surg) for my first rotation, which is where many people in the program start out on. The floor was a really interesting experience. All the things learned in training are important on this floor and there is a lot of hands on experience with patients on this floor. Some things you get to do include passing out water and food, taking vitals, and helping the nurses with whatever they need. The first rotation was very intense at first for me because I have never done anything like this before, but the nurses were very helpful and they helped me whenever I asked. I am currently on the 5th floor, post partum, and it is a very different experience than the 8th floor. On this floor, there are more opportunities to get close to the nurses and find out what their experience in the field has been like.

This program is a really good opportunity for anybody who is interested in the medical field. One of the advantages of doing this program over others is that you have the opportunity to work in different floors. Each rotation opens up more floors for you to volunteer on. For example, once you get to the 4th rotation, you could have the opportunity to work in the emergency department. I would really encourage anybody who is considering this program to do it. It may seem like a lot with the three days of training, but it really does pay off if you put in the effort. The first rotation can be somewhat rough, but it definitely gets better as you progress through the program.

Anonymous
2nd Semester Student
Fall 2011
3/5

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One Response to St. Francis Medical Center – Health Scholar Program

  1. Annette Eom says:

    I have been involved in St. Francis Medical Center Clinical Care Extender program for four rotations. I have been in Medical Surgery, Intensive Care Unit, Nursery, and Emergency department. Despite that SFMC’s program requires a lot of time in that I have to work 4 hours a week, it is absolutely a rewarding experience. Volunteers get to move on to a different floor after completing 48 hours at one department. The variety of the departments SFMC offer gives volunteers exposure to different settings and situations. The tasks given are very practical and the health care team are super friendly and helpful. I have been helping out patients mainly by taking vitals, passing out food trays and water, and helping the nurses with tasks they ask me to do. Since most of the patients at SFMC speak Spanish, it is also a good place to brush up your Spanish skills. Emergency department was the department I liked the most in that the floor is usually busier and the health care team needs lots of assistance such as making beds, registering patients, instructing patients to examination rooms, and discharging them to different units. Also I got to see different patients with different illnesses and work with EMTs.
    This program is highly recommendable to those who want to gain lots of hands on experience and to experience different floor units in the hospital. While it is time intensive, you will be gaining a lot from it.

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